Review: Empire of Night by Kelley Armstrong

21480854Empire of Night by Kelley Armstrong

Published by: Doubleday Canada

Publication Date: April 7, 2015

Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy, High Fantasy

Extent: 432 pages

Rating: 4/5

Source: Purchase


Sisters Moria and Ashyn are the Keeper and Seeker of Edgewood.

Or at least, they were.

Their village is gone. Their friends have betrayed them. And now, they are all but prisoners in court, forced to watch and wait while the Emperor decides whether to help the children of Edgewood, who remain hostages of the treacherous Alvar Kitsune.

But when the emperor finally sends the girls on a mission to rescue the children – accompanied by Prince Tyrus and a small band of men – the journey proves more perilous than any of them could have imagined. With lies and unrest mounting in the empire, Moria and Ashyn will have to draw on every bit of influence and power they possess to unite their people and avert an all-out war.

In this second book in her epic and captivating Age of Legends trilogy, #1 New York Times bestselling author Kelley Armstrong blends romance, danger, and magic to send readers on a heart-racing journey through an unforgettable world.


Empire of Night is what I’ve been waiting for out of this series! It bursts with honour, duty, filial piety, betrayals, and political trickery and plays. It certainly doesn’t suffer from second book syndrome. It is, by far, my favourite out of the series. Kelley’s plot twists are action packed and fast paced.

Once Moria and Ashyn, the Keeper and Seeker, find refuge at the Empire, Emperor Jiro Tatsu tasks them with the duty to find the missing Edgewood children, along with Ronan, an exiled convict who escapes the Forest of the Dead with Ashyn, and the Emperor’s bastard son Tyrus. But this journey proves more dangerous than anyone expects.

In this instalment, you get more multi-layered characters. Tyrus is a worthy companion for Moria, and while he doesn’t push Moria like Gavril does, he has a sixth sense when it comes to her, as if he and she have bonded over years rather than weeks. They share an intense chemistry, but I wonder which relationship will prevail: Moria and Tyrus or Moria and Gavril.

And here is where I gush over Moria’s arc. What more can you throw at a character? Kelley pits her against ruthless guards, dangerous beasties that she’d never think she’d see, and the savage Alvar Kitsune. Moria is the star attraction. I love her growth. But I can’t forget Ashyn. She’s one character who exhibits a strong quietude that flourishes once she sees herself as something more than her sister’s shadow. Because of their Northern heritage, Ashyn and Moria are seen as fetishes, a part of a minority, and simpleminded creatures. Readers can argue that the main characters are still white, but Kelley plays these race scenes and division in ethnicities rather well, and they bring a unique twist to the series.

Japanese heritage and history take centre stage in this instalment. Kelley sticks to the honour and duty that many families revered in that society, especially filial piety. And these morals intertwine in each character and arc. You especially see them in Tyrus and Gavril. Although I enjoyed reading Sea of Shadows, I felt that is too isolated, and even though the reawakened creatures and the kidnapped children carry the book quite well, Empire of Night expands on the world building tenfold. You finally see how the imperial city rules its lands and its people and how the citizens of the Empire are anxious, wary, and concerned of the unexplained occurrences.

Alvar––the former imperial marshal and father of Gavril, a warrior who helps Moria escape the ruins of Edgewood in Sea of Shadows––uses that suppressed fear and morphs it into a beast waiting to attack the imperial family and Empire itself. Some residents still question the exile of Alvar. Gavril doesn’t play a huge role in Empire of Night, but he does play a pivotal one, though. So at least we get some good Gavril parts.

The Age of Legends series gets better after every book. Forest of Ruin will be a great finale to this thrilling series! I hope Ashyn gets her chance to show this cruel world what her strength really is. And that ending killed me.

What did you think of this book or series? What were your thoughts on that ending? Expecting it or not? Tell me in the comments!

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Bookish Finds (3)

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Bookish Finds is a monthly series that features bookish products. This month’s post will showcase Halloween-inspired goodies. What else do you think I’d write about?

Happy haunting, ghouls and goblins!!

 

Dracula Scarf

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Get in the Halloween spirit with a Dracula scarf. Margo and Tala @ the Literati Club make a variety of bookish goodies: scarves, hats, beanies, umbrellas, dresses, t-shirts, bags, and headbands. They are all hand made. Go take a look! You’ll be surprised at what you find. I may just snag this one for me!

 

Halloween Dust Jackets

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Aren’t these jackets just adorable? Eee! Throw in some macabre, put in some gargoyles, skulls, black candles, and moss, and you’ll have a creepy Halloween centrepiece for your next Halloween party. South House Boutique offers three dust jackets that are printed on high quality paper, which will last for years. You’ll get these covers: The Headless Horseman by D. Capitation, Her Ghoulish Ways by P & Ma Caub, and Anatomy of a Werewolf by Claude & Harry Graysons. Each cover measures at 9.5 x 19″. And they’ll fit typical standard hardcovers.

 

Sugar Skull Bookmark

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Celebrate Halloween and Dia de los Muertos all in one bookmark. This bookmark features a Mexican skull skeleton playing a guitar or maracas and your choice of a glass crystal bead. It’ll dangle over the spine, so you’ll always see it! It measures in at 3.5″ and is a nickle-free alloy metal.

You can find other bookmarks, like vampire teeth, werewolves, and faeries at Spotlight Jewelry.

 

Brothers Grimm’s Fairy Tales Book Purse

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This Brothers Grimm’s Fairy Tales leather book purse designed by Krukrustudio will delight any reader. It features the following: genuine leather, magnet snap closure, two inner pockets, and adjustable shoulder strap. It also comes in black and brown. You can find other book purses, like Jane Austen and Frankenstein at Krukrustudio.

 

Halloween Book Pumpkin

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Whimsy Workshop has designed this adorable bookish pumpkin. Yes, cutting up and damaging a book isn’t always a good present for book lovers, but many can’t resist this treat! It’d look perfect on a decked-out porch or mantel.

Joint Review: A Torch against the Night by Sabaa Tahir

atorchagainstthenight_051116-1A Torch against the Night by Sabaa Tahir

Published by: Razorbill

Publication Date: August 30, 2016

Genre: Fantasy, Young Adult, Dystopian

Extent: 464 pages

Rating: 5/5

Source: Purhcase


Following the events of the Fourth Trial, an army led by Masks hunts the two fugitives as they escape the city of Serra and journey across the vast lands of the Martial Empire.
 
Laia is determined to break into Kauf—the Empire’s most secure and dangerous prison—and save her brother, whose knowledge of Serric steel is the key to the Scholars’ future. And Elias is determined to stay by Laia’s side…even if it means giving up his own chance at freedom.
 
But Elias and Laia will have to fight every step of the way if they’re going to outsmart their enemies: the bloodthirsty Emperor Marcus, the merciless Commandant, the sadistic Warden of Kauf, and, most heartbreaking of all, Helene—Elias’s former friend and the Empire’s newest Blood Shrike.

Helene’s mission is horrifying, unwanted, and clear: find the traitor Elias Veturius and the Scholar slave who helped him escape…and kill them both.


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I just. No. I. Ugh. WHY. Why do you do this to me, Sabaa? Why? That ending. No, wait, this book. And honestly, I thought––clearly wrong––I understood your plot twists, but no. To be fair, I was expecting spectacular arcs, unbelievable despair, blood-stained streets, redemption, and an unsatiable desire to kill the Commandant, Marcus, and, surprisingly at the end, someone else who shall remain nameless. Clearly, I’ve received all these goodies, except they broke me. ANYWAYS. Now let’s move on to the review so I can wallow in my pain.

And don’t forget to check out Dana’s review @ Dana and the Books as well! I also want to thank Hafsah Faizal @ Icey Books for allowing me to use this ATATN quote banner! I love it.

***

A Torch against the Night quickly starts off where An Ember in the Ashes ends. While the fury of the Commandant, the Academy, and the Masks sweeps up behind Elias and Laia, they escape the ruins of Serra by travelling through the catacombs. Fighting against time, destiny, and unforeseen forces, Elias must find a way to rescue Darin, Laia’s brother, who’s trapped in Kauf Prison. Yet what is he willing to give up to break out Darin, protect Laia, and redeem himself? Everything. Sabaa sucks you back in this world by starting off Torch with heart-thumping and nail-biting action.

She weaves in a cold brutality into her world. It snakes through the darkened streets and touches every single person in the Empire. Either it kills those people, or it moulds them into something fierce, hard, and sometimes maniacal. She creates such a superb world building that may outshine her first book and offers much more backstory, which I love. The Nightbringer’s decision to decimate the Scholars brings a whole new twist to the series.

She also opens up this world through cut-throat politics. You delve more into this complicated realm, where one-upping your opponent doesn’t mean you impale them on your sword. You outwit them. And I have to admit that Kauf Prison scares me. Not many things do. Well, okay, beauty pageant kids, peacocks, and blue jays unnerve me, but everything else is fair game. Sabaa’s prose evokes images of the unkempt bodies, tortured screams, and death on your skin. Reading the prison scenes are torture.

The characters and their journey shape this book into a solid character-driven story. They become the book’s backbone. Sabaa expands on her characters as well. You get to see Mamie Rila, Avitas Harper (I DID NOT see that plot twist coming), Afya Ara-Nur, Helene’s family, Shaeva, and many memorable others. She continues with the first-person, multiple POVs. And she gives you Helene’s! Helene’s honour and her vow to Empire and Emperor will tear you apart. She, the new Blood Shrike, feels the crushing weight to keep order, find and possibly kill Elias, and restore power to an Empire that she ultimately questions.

 

“Failure doesn’t define. It’s what you do after you fail that determines whether you are a leader or a waste of perfectly good air.”

Laia, the Lioness’ daughter, goes from a scared girl who spies for the Resistence to a woman who won’t let pain or fear control her. Her failures and missteps turn her into a leader and break that little girl who made jams with her Grandmother. Instead of wallowing in self-doubt, she learns from them and learns how to be the leader who she must be. What I love the most is that she refuses to let this betrayal destroy her. She rises above and and lets the past, these mistakes, and the people who help her shape her.

 

“You are my temple,” I murmur as I kneel beside her. “You are my priest. You are my prayer. You are my release.”

Elias. Oh my, Elias. I thought I had fictional crushes before, but I was wrong. He stays true to who is. His character development jumps off each page I read, and I lapped it up every chance I got. He devotes his life to redeem himself so he can change this world. And he will not let destiny outsmart him. He won’t let his training turn him into his mother or won’t allow this world destroy him. Besides Helene’s growth, his is one of the best I’ve read. God, I can’t get enough of this character!

And I can’t help but say that MY OTP LIVES! And no, I won’t tell you who it is! MUAH! 😈

 

Sabaa’s writing will take hold of you and won’t let go. Prepare to cry, rage, throw your book (lightly please. Book abuse should be criminal!), and cry some more. I’m emotionally unstable after this book. Wake me up when the third book is out!

 

What did you think of A Torch against the Night? Did it meet your expectations? Bore you? Tell me in the comments! I’ve been dying to talk about it.

 

And here’s the perfect GIF for THAT moment in the book:

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And at the end:

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Book Haul: October 2016

Well, you see, this month I’ve gone through a bit of a buying splurge. I don’t know why. No, I do, but I’m trying to cushion the blow. I still have books waiting on my shelf, but alas, once I see a great deal, I kind of destroy my bank account. Or my savings, to be exact.

I can’t wait to get my hands on these pretties! BUT WHY DID I BLOODY AGREE TO HAVE THE LAST TWO BOOKS BE CHRISTMAS PRESENTS?! What was I thinking? I am a masochist. Through and through. Ahem. Now cue the regularly scheduled squee moment. 😂

16096824.jpgA Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas

I’ve been hearing pretty good reviews of this series, particularly the sequel, so I had to buy the first book. I haven’t gotten into fairy tale retellings, though. I’m a little late on this band wagon, but I can’t pass up on a book that retells Beauty and the Beast and also has faeries in it. I hope it’s great!

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17927395.jpgA Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas

Why would I start a series and just not buy the sequel? That excuse is what I’m going with. I’m not that much of a masochistic. Screw that. I still am. But I need more faeries in my life, and I’ll be damned if I’ll wait for an already released sequel.

Some of my blogger friends (oh, hi darlings!) have told me that this instalment makes up for a few issues in the first book.

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23299512.jpgThis Savage Song by Victoria Schwab

Don’t hate me, but This Savage Song will be the first Schwab book I’ve ever read. But her Shades of Magic series has been sitting on my TBR list for a year. I love that there are ZERO love stories in this book. ZERO. ZILCH. But tons of monsters. What more can a woman ask for? MONSTERS. Give me monsters.

…And I’m more twisted than my Mom thinks I am. Wonderful. PHEER ME.

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27969081.jpgLabyrinth Lost by Zoraida Córdova

Ah mah gerd. It’s here. Besides Leigh Bardugo’s Six of Crows, Labyrinth Lost is one of the most gorgeous books I’ve seen this year. And FINALLY I get to see more diversity and LGBTG storylines in books (I have to give Sabaa Tahir more credit here, though).

I also adore how Zoriada has incorporated brujas/brujos and Latin American themes into her book.

A fellow blogger’s post pushed me to buy it. Yeah, I’m talking about you, Danya @ Fine Print!

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Audio Review: Omari and the People by Stephen Whitfield

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I’ve received an audiobook for an honest review. The Audiobookworm introduced to me this book. I have to admit this audiobook is my first! And I wasn’t sure what to expect listening to a book, not reading one. The audiobook definitely surprised me!


23962975.jpgOmari and the People by Stephen Whitfield

Narrated by: Curt Simmons

Publication Date: August 22, 2014 (print)/June 20, 2016 (audio)

Genre: Fantasy, Drama, Historical

Length: 11 hours and 17 minutes

Rating: 4/5

Source: Audiobook from The Audiobookworm


In a squalid ancient city on the edge of a desert (based in part on the African Sahara’s Empty Quarter) a weary, thrill-seeking thief named Omari sets his home afire to start anew and to cover his many crimes. When the entire city is unintentionally destroyed by the flames, the cornered thief tells the displaced people a lie about a better place which only he can lead them to, across the desert. With the help of an aged, mysterious woman who knows a better place actually does exist, they set out. The desperate people must come together to fight their way through bandits, storms, epidemics, and more. As a result of Omari’s involvement with Saba, a fiercely independent woman who is out to break him in the pay of a merchant whom he has offended, his ability  to lead – his very life – is jeopardized.


“Like wisps of vapour that form a cloud, their shared memories and desires rise up from their souls, merge, and become the story.”

Wow. I wasn’t sure what to expect with Stephen’s book. It definitely intrigues me. And I’m happy to be given the opportunity to review the audiobook. The audiobook adds an extra level of interest. Stephen’s writing and Curt’s narration produce powerful images in your mind. The author has an intrinsic ability to shape his words into something tangible. He doesn’t tell you what happens; he shows you. And Curt complements Stephen’s work beautifully. You can smell the fire and picture the people as they flee the burning city. Omari and the People is truly a character-driven piece.

“You are smart. You are strong. You are brave. And you care. This is why you will lead these people across the sands.”

Omari, the elusive Phantom Thief and an unlikely saviour who fears his identity will be figured out, leads people across the unforgiving desert after he intentionally sets his house on fire to escape a life he loathes, and thus accidentally burns down their City. He’s reluctant to help them. He has no love for them. They aren’t his people. He’d rather abandon them and leave. But when an elderly and often forgotten woman encourages him to guide them to a paradise just past the desert, he sees an opportunity he knows he can’t refuse.

Omari and the People reminds me of the classic legends. People pass them down from generation to generation. And this book touches on that lore. I love how Stephen captures the human condition. He creates beautiful yet mortal characters. You can see a lot of youtself in them. And you ask yourself what you’re willing to do to survive, what you’ll give up in order to believe in a man who says he’ll give you more.

Along their path, Omari and the caravan face illnesses, threats of starvation, raiders, insects, and internal conflicts. But the people are at the heart of this story. Omari is flawed, yes. But he’s a good example of being a human. The people shape him, and he, too, moulds them into a family. One character who surprised me the most is Umal, the woman who sets Omari on his path. This sorceress is the shining beacon in a bleak desert backdrop. I adore her.

Sometimes there are stories that you may never have picked up because you thought they’re the same old. This one? No. This book will surprise you. Curt’s narration will hook you, and Stephen’s clever writing will make you want more.

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Review: Rex, by Cody Stewart, Adam Rock, and Mark Rogers

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I’ve received an eARC for an honest review. I’ve had such a great time trampling in the swamps and roaming with TJ, Sam, and Rex. This middle-grade book is surprise I’ve been waiting for. It made me jump back in to my younger self, and I was sad to read the last page!

I’m thrilled to be a part of Rex‘s blog tour. So here we go!


rex-epub-cov2_origRex by Cody B. Stewart, Adam Rock, and Mark Rogers

Published by: Common Deer Press

Publication Date: October 5, 2016

Genre: Middle Grade

Extent: 292 pages

Rating: 4/5

Source: eARC from Publisher


When eleven-year-old TJ finds a weird looking egg in the Florida Everglades after a tropical storm rips through, naturally he takes it home for identification. It could be the egg of a mutant duck or something, which would be awesome. Problem is, the egg doesn’t look like it came from a mallard, even a mutated one—it’s too big and heavy and…strange. So he hides it away in his closet and continues on with his life as usual, doing his best to ignore the creepy men constantly banging at his front door and the significant rise in military helicopter sightings in his typically quiet neighbourhood.

Then one day he comes home from school and it’s as though a cyclone has ripped through his bedroom. Suddenly, TJ knows he’s dealing with something a little more interesting—and a little more deadly—than a duck.


“Nothing really exciting ever happened in Greenmarsh.”

Oh, TJ, you are so wrong!

With a sprinkle of Jurassic Park and a dash of E.T., Rex throws you into a coming-of-age journey where an adrenaline-filled boy stumbles upon a T. Rex egg and uncovers a sinister government cover-up.

I don’t read many middle-grade books, but when I had the opportunity to get my (digital) hands on this one, I wasn’t expecting Rex to get me hooked so quickly! The little girl in me who dreamed of owning and training a raptor wanted to see where this story goes (Star Lord, eat your heart out).

Rex reminds me of Ray Bradbury’s The Halloween Tree and the movies E.T., The Goonies, and Jurassic Park. It has a strong 90s feels to it, even though the book’s setting is in the present time. I felt as if I’ve stepped back into my scuffed sneakers, dropped my Nano Kitty into my pocket, and, this time, looked for my very own T. Rex. I’ve read only five books that transported me back to my crazy childhood, so I’m happy to take that trip again.

 

“Oh man, I’m probably breaking so many dinosaur etiquette rules right now…but I really wish I could’ve gone out in some way that didn’t involve being digested.”

TJ––a typical eleven year old who wants a dog and hopes for the trio of goons to stop bullying him––is an only child to a single mother, who works several jobs just to keep the roof over their heads. He and his best friend, Sam, are practically joined at the hip. While they’re out on a Cub Scout scavenger hunt, he discovers an egg. But when the army rolls in to his small town, Greenmarsh, he knows what he really finds is a lot more than an egg. The army gets closer to him and the dinosaur affectionately named Rex, and TJ realizes he has to sneak Rex out of the town to protect him. How? Through a science fair, of course.

 

“Honey, what’s morning rule number three?”

“Never talk about swamp people before Mom’s had her coffee.”

The humour in Rex will hook you from the beginning. Rex appeals to all readers. The 30-year-old nerd will fall in love with TJ, Sam, and Rex, just as much as the 12 year old will. It also offers you an authentic taste of what a true family is. But in this case, this family is an eclectic bunch: a Doctor Who-fanatic mom, a boy who loves to tinker, a protective friend, and a loyal, cold-blooded, and adorable dinosaur, a substitute for a dog.

TJ’s mom, Ellen, and TJ have a genuine bond that many readers can relate to. They banter. They argue. And they protect one another when the other doesn’t realize. He also brings out the kid in her. She gives everything for her little man and is willing to give more to see that smile on his face. Their relationship shines for me. It reminds me of mine with my Mom.

 

Rex is an enchanting story that transports you back to your childhood and stomps its way into your heart. I highly recommend this book to any reader! I can’t wait to step back into Greenmarsh again.

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Author Spotlight and Q&A with Rex’s Cody Stewart, Adam Rocke, and Mark Rogers

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Today, I am excited to announce the release of Rex, by Adam Rocke, Mark Rogers, and Cody Stewart. I’ve set up a spotlight and a Q&A with the authors!  I’m in love with this book and can’t wait to see it released for everyone to read!

I hope you enjoy.


Title: Rex

Author: Adam Rocke, Mark Rogers, Cody B. Stewart

Genre: Middle Grade

Release date: October 5, 2016

Publisher: Common Deer Press

Buy here:

Indigo | Amazon CAN | Amazon US

Previous Post: Cover Reveal Tour

 When eleven-year-old TJ finds a weird looking egg in the Florida Everglades after a tropical storm rips through, naturally he takes it home for identification. It could be the egg of a mutant duck or something, which would be awesome. Problem is, the egg doesn’t look like it came from a mallard, even a mutated one—it’s too big and heavy and…strange. So he hides it away in his closet and continues on with his life as usual, doing his best to ignore the creepy men constantly banging at his front door and the significant rise in military helicopter sightings in his typically quiet neighbourhood.

Then one day he comes home from school and it’s as though a hand grenade has gone off inside his bedroom. Suddenly, TJ knows he’s dealing with something a little more interesting—and a little more deadly—than a duck.

The Authors


Cody B. Stewart

Cody B. Stewart was born in the Adirondacks, in Upstate New York. His love of stories began in those mountains as he vanquished trolls, fought in the American Revolution and discovered his latent mutant powers. Stories have continued to consume his life, but he now plucks them out of his head and puts them down on paper in the form of novels and comic books. He left the Adirondacks to grow into a man, did so, and has since returned with a wonderfully supportive wife and two sons.

Author’s Website | Facebook | Twitter

Adam Rocke


Adam Rocke Slutsky never met an adventure he didn’t love. From swimming with great white sharks without a cage, to jumping out of a plane without a parachute, Adam’s adrenaline junkie tendencies play a major role in his writing. Throw in a secondary degree in CryptoZoology and it’s anyone’s guess where Adam’s literary travels will take him.

Author’s Website

Mark Rogers
Mark’s career as a travel journalist has brought him to 56 countries and counting. These trips have fed his imagination while at the same time provided authentic experiences and sensory detail that find their way into his novels and screenplays. Mark’s won multiple awards for his travel writing, including an award for his Hurricane Ivan coverage in Jamaica. His work regularly appears in USA Today and other media outlets. Mark lives in Baja California with his Sinaloa-born wife, Sophy, where they recently built a rock house overlooking the sea.

Author’s Website | Facebook | Twitter

Q&A


What sparked your idea(s) to write a story about a boy and his t-rex? Have any books or movies inspired you to write this story?

Adam:

The inspiration for Rex stems from a “swamp survival” course I did in the Florida Everglades. While I didn’t find any dinosaur eggs—or any spooky CIA secret agents for that matter—I did find a few alligator snapping turtle eggs, and these got my creative juices flowing. The scenery in there is so amazing, and when it gets dark—whoa! It’s like a whole different world. The Everglades is really a character unto itself!

Mark:

I was a bit of a TJ myself, heading into the woods every day at the age of five until seven years old, for full days of looking for box turtles, salamander, and huge beetles living in logs. These were great days without a grown-up in sight.

Cody:

I have a lot in common with TJ. My brothers and sisters were all out of the house when I was around TJ’s age, and I lived in the middle of the Adirondacks, so there weren’t many people around. I spent most of my time making up stories as I explored the woods. Those stories always involved me running around with fantastic creatures.

This book is a joint project from all three of you. What drew you to be a part of this book? Who contributed to what?

Adam:

The way I see it, the three of us are like a “dream team” for this story. We all have different backgrounds, different life experiences, and different writing styles and tones. So we could bring different thoughts and emotions to each character, each chapter, each “scene” in the story. Then, when we put it all together, and filled in the gaps, we knew we had something special

Mark:

My inspiration was meeting someone as rare and strange as Rex – Adam Rocke. He invited me in to add a little extra something to the Rex project. We had written another novel together and knew we had what it took to create a book that was greater than the sum of its parts. Then when Cody joined in, the magic took off to the nth power.

Cody:

I’m incredibly grateful that Adam and Mark invited me to be part of Rex. I’ve learned so much about writing and the writing business from them and the process. Accepting their invitation was a no-brainer for me. They were positive that they had a great story to tell and that it would take off. And they were right. Rex is a story with so much heart, humor and adventure. I jumped at the chance to help shape it.

Many people have gained a love of dinosaurs over years. What do you believe interests readers on their love of dinosaurs?

Adam:

For me, dinosaurs are the ultimate story creatures because they’re real. At least, they were. Grasping the concept that actual monsters once roamed the earth is really cool. And to think, maybe they’re still out there somewhere. Just because we haven’t found yet doesn’t mean they no longer exist. In the deepest depths of the ocean, or somewhere in the lush jungle, maybe, just maybe, there are leftovers from a prehistoric era.

Mark:

I’ve never met a kid who didn’t love playing with dinosaur toys, reading dinosaur books, or seeing their bones in a museum. Part of the appeal for kids may be because dinosaurs roamed the earth before there were schools, chores, and big people telling you what to do. Also, with all of the scientific strides being made, who’s to say a Jurassic Park scenario is impossible?

Cody:

Dinosaurs make the ultimate What if? story. What if they never went extinct? What if humans and dinosaurs lived side by side? What would it be like if dinosaurs existed on our modern day earth? It’s fun to imagine because they really did exist, not like unicorns. And, really, unicorns are just horses with horns. Not that awesome. But dinosaurs are practically dragons that walked on the same ground that we walk on now!

Congratulations on the potential movie deal! What are your thoughts on Disney, 20th Century Fox, and Sony Pictures circling your book?

Adam:

The thought that our story could actually be made into a movie is incredibly exciting. From a writer’s standpoint, it’s always flattering to have people respond to your writing. And the fact that so many people have responded thus far takes that flattery to another level. But it’s important to remain level-headed; Hollywood is filled with almosts and near-misses. Just because we have a ton of interest doesn’t mean we’ll land a deal. And even if we do get a deal, that doesn’t mean a movie will ever get made. But still, it’s awesome to sit back and watch it all unfold and we’re all truly appreciative of the time and attention that Rex is receiving.

Mark:

We’re all excited about a possible film – whether it would be live action with lots of CGI, or an animated movie. There’s a famous saying about Hollywood: “It’s the only place in the world that can encourage you to death.” So I’d say we’re doing a good job managing expectations, while still now and then.letting fly with a “Whoop! Whoop!”

Cody:

I don’t even really comprehend the question. It doesn’t seem real. Actual living people who work for the biggest companies in the film industry have read something that I wrote and at least thought, “Well, this isn’t the worst.” For me, that alone is a win and incredibly flattering. But, like Adam and Mark said, there is no guarantee a Rex movie will happen, so I try to stay grounded. Still, that doesn’t mean I don’t imagine what I’d name the dinosaur I genetically engineer with all my Hollywood money. His name would be Newman, and he would be a triceratops.

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