The Wanderlust Tag

Morning friends and fam,

I always get thrilled when I see book bloggers growing and expanding their sites. I am happy to find out that Lexie has created her first tag! And she happened to tag me in it. I want to thank her for doing so. Sending my love back to you, deary. So let’s get to it.

The Rules

  • Mention the creator of the tag and link back to original post [Alexandra @ Reading by Starlight]
  • Thank the blogger who tagged you
  • Answer the 10 questions below using any genre
  • Tag 5+ friend

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Beauty and the Beast Book Tag

 

My two favourite bloggers Jess and Teagan, from Fiction No Chaser, tagged me. And I nearly squealed when I read the title. I’m in love with Beauty and the Beast and can’t get enough of the retellings. So I can’t pass up this tag.

So let’s get onto it, shall we?

 

Tale as Old as Time | A Popular Theme, Trope, or Setting You Will Never Get Bored of Reading

Enemies-to-lovers trope. I’ll support this trope until my dying day. I wouldn’t be surprised if I mention it on my tombstone.

 

Belle | A Book You Bought for Its Beautiful Cover That’s Just as Beautiful on the Inside Too

I had no expectations coming into An Enchantment of Ravens. Many readers compared it to A Court of Thorns and Roses, and those comments worried me. But this debut novel is so much more than that.

 

Gaston | A Book Everyone Loves That You Don’t

As much as I wanted to love this sequel, I didn’t enjoy reading it. I felt so confused at the beginning and wasn’t sure what was happening. And when I found out, I just wanted to throw the book at the wall.

 

Lefou | A Loyal Sidekick You Can’t Help But Love More Than Their Counterpart

I WANT TO HUG CRICKET SO MUCH. It’s the most adorable sidekick. And its attitude and sass just make me love it more.

 

Mrs. Potts, Chip, Lumiere, and Cogsworth | A Book That Helped You Through a Difficult Time or Taught You Something Valuable

I rarely talk about Ami’s work. And I feel I do a disservice to one of the most talented authors I’ve ever read. The Birth House is an eloquent, heartbreaking, and poignant debut novel. Even though the main character, Nora, is quiet, she speaks for the women who can’t stand up for themselves.

 

Something There | A Book or Series You Weren’t Into at First But Picked Up Towards the End

Even though I enjoyed reading it, I wasn’t sure if I’d love the book. It is the first Marissa book I read, so I wasn’t a Lunar fan yet. And I was close to not finishing it. But now, I can’t wait for the sequel!

 

Be Our Guest | A Fictional Character You’d Love to Have Over for Dinner

Will Herondale!!! He breaks my heart every time I think of him. But more importantly, I want to discuss books and bash the ones he hates. And I have an overwhelming urge to hide rubber ducks all over the house.

 

Tag Time!

Jill | NinaKristin | Aimee | Norrie | Amber | Jennifer | Kalina | Hamad | Lily | Mara

Top Ten Tuesday | Hidden Gems

Happy Tuesday, dearies!

Finally! I can breathe. The constant heatwaves just make me want Fall to come sooner. I shouldn’t complain since I’ve just seen the weekend’s temps. 😐 Who’s ready for cozy blankets and sweaters, hot chocolate, scary books, and bonfires? I know I am.

Top Ten Tuesday, originally created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, is a weekly meme. For this week’s topic, we discuss hidden gem books. I had a hard time with this post. I wasn’t sure which books to put on my list and which ones to take out. So hopefully, you enjoy it more than I have. 😂 Here are my choices for books I don’t talk much about:

 

Grace and Fury

I’ve seen quite a bit of marketing for the book. But I haven’t talked much about it though. I wasn’t sure if I’d read the book, until I won it in an IndigoTeen contest. But the premise of it is one of the most unique concepts I’ve seen lately, so it deserves a bit more attention than it has received.

 

City of Ghosts

Yes, since it’s a Schwab book, it’ll receive great marketing. However, I’ve seen several readers hesitate to pick it up since it’s geared toward middle-grade readers. But often times, I’ve found great storylines in MG books. And with that thought, I believe more people should take a risk with Schwab’s latest story.

 

Black Witch

Black Witch had a solid marketing plan. But some readers were turned off because select reviewers ripped apart this book. Now, I haven’t read it yet, so I can’t back up some adult bloggers’ claims, but I know many people refused to read it, which I find unfortunate. So no one gave the book a chance. But I hope to do so soon so I can see if those claims are true or false. You can find more information about the controversy here.

 

The Wicked Deep

I wasn’t sure if I’d love the book. The author combines the Salem Witch Trials and Hocus Pocus. And if there’s one thing you should know about me is that I adore that movie. My expectations were high, but I loved the book, even the ending, which is slightly predictable. Unfortunately, since the publication, I haven’t seen many bloggers mention it.

 

An Enchantment of Ravens

Quite a few readers have compared the book to ACOTAR, and I think that does a disservice to it. When I finally picked it up, I had no expectations, but I haven’t talked about it since. However, I was so pleased with the writing, storytelling, and characters. Unfortunately, it hasn’t moved past that comparison, which is a shame.

 

Wild Beauty

I bought this book earlier this year, and while I haven’t read it yet (I need to stop buying books and not reading them), I haven’t seen a lot of love for it. But magical realism is sometimes hard to sell though. Not everyone likes it, and other readers may not even acknowledge this kind of genre. But I’m intrigued to see if it lives up to my expectations.

 

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

I haven’t cried so hard reading another book. I found this beauty several, several years ago, and I’ve read it so many times you can see my fingerprints on the book. I’m a historical book lover, and I’ll always fall hard for a story based in WWII. The storyline is heartbreaking, and the stellar cast of characters will stay with you longer than you read the book.

And it deserves all the praise it has received because of the Netflix show. I highly recommend both show and book!

Top Ten Tuesday | Books I’m Glad I Didn’t DNF

Hey, everyone!!!

And guess what day it is. I’m excited for this week’s Top Ten Tuesday, created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. For this week, we have to talk about books we’ve DNF’d. Let me admit this: I rarely DNF. I don’t know why. Maybe I feel that I can’t do the book justice until I read the entire thing, or perhaps I’m just a stickler for finishing books. So I’ve picked the books I’m glad I didn’t DNF.

 

War Storm by Victoria Aveyard

How can I possibly put an Aveyard book on this list?! Well, there’s always a first. I adore the Red Queen series, but I didn’t like the ending of War Storm. And I wonder if I’ll be able to write a review in the near future because I’m so undecided about everything. But the series is over, and I can’t help but still love it regardless of the ending.

 

The Wicked Deep Shea Ernshaw

Sometimes I enjoy a slow burn, and The Wicked Deep proves just that. I fell in love with the design of the book, especially the external design. But I felt like I couldn’t connect with the characters. But I soldiered through, and I didn’t believe I’d read the last page.

 

Batman: Nightwalker by Marie Lu

Batman has been in my life long before I can possibly remember. Even though I’m a big Marvel fangirl, Batman owns a good chunk of my nerd heart. So I knew I had to read this book. I honestly thought I’d DNF it though. The pacing may throw you off, but wait until the end.

 

An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

Yes, yes, you all know I’ll read anything ACOTAR. And I thought this book may piggyback onto that fandom. However, Margaret proves the readers wrong by creating a lush, imaginative, and lively faerieland. The fae actually have a weakness, and they aren’t truly human. I thought I’d trash this book, but I was wrong.

 

This Savage Song by Victoria Schwab

I loved this series. I felt the pace in the first book might have persuaded me to put down the book, but I fell in love with the characters. So I had no chance to put this back in my TBR list. I’m glad I persisted since this series is one of my favourites.

 

Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake,

I’m not a fan of characters cheating. I’m also not a fan of women stealing other women’s boyfriends. I hate when authors pull that kind of trope. It spoils the book and the reading experience. I would like nothing more than to see those two characters die a horrible and painful death.

But the overall story and worldbuilding are what save this story for me. And I’m hoping to get to the sequel…soon.

Best Books of 2017

Hey, everyone!

Look at me forgetting to work on this post until the end of January. 😅 I need be a personal assistant to harass me every day. Well, better late than never! I’ve picked my top six reads of 2017. And even though I’d love to add more, these books are my favourites:

 

The Language of Thorns by Leigh Bardugo

Leigh is my queen, and I’ll buy anything and everything she’ll write. She recreates readers’ cherished fairy tales and lore, then puts her own twists onto them. Women are at the forefront of this fairy tale retelling. They don’t need anyone, even a man, to save them. They’ll find their own happy ending. And they’ll save themselves. The illustrations set this book apart from others. I cannot recommend it more!

 

A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas

Problems aside, this finale is solid. I don’t think anything will top A Court of Mist and Fury, but I love every single character arc, the High Lords’ meeting, and the gut-wrenching page 666 (I still can’t talk about it). The bond among the Archeron sisters will break your heart, then Feysand will shatter it. And I’m down for NESSIAN.

And have you seen the cover for A Court of Frost and Starlight?! Can we fangirl over it, please???

Warcross by Marie Lu

Virtual reality is taken to another level. I read this book earlier this month, but this one is, by far, the best novel I’ve read in a long time. I cannot get enough of this series. And I wish this series wasn’t a duology, but alas, it is. Emi may just steal your heart; she certainly has with mine. Marie makes me want to get back into science fiction books.

 

Flame in the Mist by Renée Ahdieh

Ah! I fell in love with the cover before I even read the blurb. It does the story justice. Flame is a beautifully written and eloquent story. It captured my attention the moment I opened the book. Now Flame is the first book I’ve read from Renée, but she has done a stellar job at creating a culturally rich storyline.

 

Now I Rise by Kiersten White

I didn’t think Kiersten could top And I Darken, but I’ve been wrong before. Ruthless, dark, and deadly, Lada has wormed her way into my heart, that feisty killer. And Radu broke it. The Conqueror’s Saga is a stellar historical YA with a touch of romance. I thoroughly loved this dangerous world.

 

An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

I wasn’t sure what to expect with this fae novel, but Margaret surprised me with her lush and imaginative writing. The characters are unforgettable, and the lore in this book will captivate. And you can’t go wrong with a cover designed by Charlie Bowater.

Review: An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

Published by: Margaret K. McElderry Books

Publication Date: September 26, 2017

Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy, Romance

Page Count: 304

Rating: 4/5

Source: Purchase

Goodreads | Indigo | Amazon CAN | Amazon US | Book Depository


Isobel is a prodigy portrait artist with a dangerous set of clients: the sinister fair folk, immortal creatures who cannot bake bread, weave cloth, or put a pen to paper without crumbling to dust. They crave human Craft with a terrible thirst, and Isobel’s paintings are highly prized among them. But when she receives her first royal patron—Rook, the autumn prince—she makes a terrible mistake. She paints mortal sorrow in his eyes – a weakness that could cost him his life.

Furious and devastated, Rook spirits her away to the autumn lands to stand trial for her crime. Waylaid by the Wild Hunt’s ghostly hounds, the tainted influence of the Alder King, and hideous monsters risen from barrow mounds, Isobel and Rook depend on one another for survival. Their alliance blossoms into trust, then love, violating the fair folks’ ruthless Good Law. There’s only one way to save both their lives, Isobel must drink from the Green Well, whose water will transform her into a fair one—at the cost of her Craft, for immortality is as stagnant as it is timeless.

Isobel has a choice: she can sacrifice her art for a future, or arm herself with paint and canvas against the ancient power of the fairy courts. Because secretly, her Craft represents a threat the fair folk have never faced in all the millennia of their unchanging lives: for the first time, her portraits have the power to make them feel.


“Why do we desire, above all other things, that which has the greatest power to destroy us?”

 

This book is magical and makes me sigh with delight. I feel remorseful for not picking it up sooner. Treat yourself to this whimsical novel, which will captivate you until the very end.

Isobel, an artist, possesses an incredible gift: the Craft, which the fae crave. She is known for her portrait paintings. Rook, the prince of the autumn court, asks her to paint his portrait, but she makes a deadly mistake by showing sorrow in his eyes. When he discovers her error, he whisks her away so she will stand trial for her crimes. But the two must depend on each other when they’re thrust on to a dangerous path that may threaten everyone.

Enchantment of Ravens slowly sneaks up on you, teases you with fae lore, then charms you all the more. I had such a pleasure reading it, and I hope we get more from this author. I’m surprised that Margaret is a duet author. Her writing captures your attention from page one. And the way she spins a sentence will surely make you hope for more.

We’ve been seeing a lot of fae-inspired stories and series. And I love quite a few of them. Now, some will stick to old fae lore where faeries are powerful yet vulnerable. In Enchantment, they cannot create the Craft (paintings, drawings, writing, and the such), so they rely on humans. And they can’t break the Good Law, which forbids fae and humans from falling in love. These mythical creatures aren’t what we’re used to seeing. Even though they have great beauty, their true form is haunting. Margaret makes these weaknesses more believable. She weaves in folklore, then incorporates enough political aspects to her story to intrigue you.

The writing and the world building will sweep you away and allow you to see a truly unique novel. I wasn’t expecting the level of detail and complexity in this multifaceted storyline. Margaret creates a lush and tangible world that I felt I was walking alongside the characters, who take centre stage.

Isobel, the protagonist, stays true to her Craft. She provides for her family even though one slip may put her life in danger. I adored reading her character progression throughout the novel. She fears giving up her talent, even when she falls in love with Rook. What’s significant in this story is that she doesn’t see the need to change who she is. Her Craft is everything. And that subtle yet important message speaks out to me.

Rook, that little cinnamon bun of quirkiness, is darling. Although he is odd, his character makes the story sparkle. I loved his weaknesses and his inability to understand humans. The relationship they build is rather precious, and I wasn’t anticipating to admire it as much as I do.

Enchantment of Ravens is one of a few books that surprises me. I want more. I want to see how Isobel and Rook’s relationship progresses. And I just want back in to wander this magical world the author has made. So I cannot recommend it more. Pick it up.

“When the world failed me, I could always lose myself in my work.”

Waiting on Wednesday: An Enchantment of Ravens and The Language of Thorns

Waiting on Wednesday, hosted by Jill @ Breaking the Spine, is a weekly meme that showcases upcoming book releases readers are eagerly awaiting.

 

An Enchantment of Ravens

Margaret Rogerson

Publication Date: September 26, 2017

Page Count: 304

Isobel is a prodigy portrait artist with a dangerous set of clients: the sinister fair folk, immortal creatures who cannot bake bread, weave cloth, or put a pen to paper without crumbling to dust. They crave human Craft with a terrible thirst, and Isobel’s paintings are highly prized among them. But when she receives her first royal patron—Rook, the autumn prince—she makes a terrible mistake. She paints mortal sorrow in his eyes – a weakness that could cost him his life.

Furious and devastated, Rook spirits her away to the autumn lands to stand trial for her crime. Waylaid by the Wild Hunt’s ghostly hounds, the tainted influence of the Alder King, and hideous monsters risen from barrow mounds, Isobel and Rook depend on one another for survival. Their alliance blossoms into trust, then love, violating the fair folks’ ruthless Good Law. There’s only one way to save both their lives, Isobel must drink from the Green Well, whose water will transform her into a fair one—at the cost of her Craft, for immortality is as stagnant as it is timeless.

Isobel has a choice: she can sacrifice her art for a future, or arm herself with paint and canvas against the ancient power of the fairy courts. Because secretly, her Craft represents a threat the fair folk have never faced in all the millennia of their unchanging lives: for the first time, her portraits have the power to make them feel.

Goodreads | Indigo | Amazon CAN | Amazon US | Book Depository

 

Why Am I Waiting?

Lately, I’ve heard a lot of buzz about this debut novel. I can’t wait to read it. I need more fae stories in my life! And just read that blurb. Doesn’t it sound wonderful?

The overall concept of the book is giving me a Wintersong feel to it. So I hope it’ll live up to the hype. And I can’t get over how beautiful that cover is!

 


The Language of Thorns

Leigh Bardugo

Publication Date: September 26, 2017

Page Count: 288

Love speaks in flowers. Truth requires thorns.

Travel to a world of dark bargains struck by moonlight, of haunted towns and hungry woods, of talking beasts and gingerbread golems, where a young mermaid’s voice can summon deadly storms and where a river might do a lovestruck boy’s bidding but only for a terrible price.

Perfect for new readers and dedicated fans, the tales in The Language of Thorns will transport you to lands both familiar and strange―to a fully realized world of dangerous magic that millions have visited through the novels of the Grishaverse.

This collection of six stories includes three brand-new tales, each of them lavishly illustrated and culminating in stunning full-spread illustrations as rich in detail as the stories themselves.

Goodreads | Indigo | Amazon CAN | Amazon US | Book Depository

 

Why Am I Waiting?

Let me be honest here. I will buy anything, ANYTHING, from Leigh, so delving more into Grishaverse is just what I’ve been looking for. Even though I haven’t read the Grisha Trilogy, which is on my Christmas haul, I’ve been dying to get into it since I first read Six of Crows. On Goodreads, I also saw some of the interior illustrations, and they’re just convincing me more to buy this book.

Secretly, since I missed out on the Grishaverse when it first came out, I hope the author will expand the world even more than she has with her two other series. A book lover can always hope!

Are you looking forward to it? Let me know in the comments!