Review | Cruel Intentions by Siobhan Davis

Cruel Intentions (Rydeville Elite #1) by Siobhan Davis

Published by: Independently published

Publication Date: June 12, 2019

Genre: New Adult, Romance, High School

Page Count: 398

Rating: 5/5

Source: Purchase

Goodreads | Amazon CAN | Amazon US | Book Depository


Life is a cruel game where only the most ruthless survive. It’s a truth my mother rebelled against, and she paid for it with her life. Now, I play their game. Publicly accepting the destiny that lies in wait for me when I turn eighteen.

But, behind closed doors, I plot my escape.

Trent, Charlie, and my twin, Drew, rule the hallways of Rydeville High with arrogance and an iron fist. I execute my role perfectly, hating every second, but they never let me forget my place in this world.

Everyone obeys the rules. They have for generations. Because our families have always been in control.

Until Cam, Sawyer, and Jackson show up. Throwing their new money around. Challenging the status quo. Setting hearts racing with their gorgeous faces, hot bodies, and bad boy attitudes.

Battle lines are drawn. Sides are taken. And I’m trapped in the middle, because I made a mistake one fateful night when I gave my V-card to a stranger in a blatant F you to my fiancé.

I thought it was the one thing I owned. A precious memory to carry me through each dark day.

I couldn’t have been more wrong.

Because the stranger was Camden Marshall, leader of the new elite and my perpetual tormenter. He hates me with a passion unrivaled, and he won’t be the only one. Fire will rain down if the truth is revealed, threatening alliances, and the power struggle will turn vicious.

My life will hang in the balance.

But I’ll be ready, and I’m not going down without a fight.


“I want to feel something real,” I reply without uncertainty. “I want to let go of these chains that bind my body. To feel like I’m in control even if it’s only an illusion.”

I devoured this all-consuming and intensely hot novel in less time than I ever imagined. It monopolized my entire time that I forgot to function. If you’re looking for an enemies-to-lovers, dark bully romance, then Cruel Intentions should be on your list! Lies, betrayal, deadly secrets, teenage angst, bullies, and hot-as-hell guys who have stolen my heart, Cruel Intentions has it all and more.

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Beyond the Blurb | Why Are Book Reviews Difficult to Write?

Morning, bloggers!

I typically talk about Twitter-related controversies in my discussion series. But I’ve wanted to discuss why reviews are so bloody hard to write. It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been blogging. Reviews are intimidating. And sometimes, you just don’t feel like writing them. And given that I’m behind on my reviews, I’m okay with that. It takes a lot of effort to write just one. Just imagine writing two or more a week.

We bloggers are up against a lot: competition, other platforms that demand more of our time, life, work, and reading and blogging slumps. When life gets in the way of blogging, reviews don’t truly matter. They don’t. But guilt eats at you and me. So why are they so damn difficult?

Here are some reasons that stick out to me:

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Beyond the Blurb | Why We Should Defend Negative Reviews

Morning, bloggers!

Bloggers sometimes dread writing bad or low-rated reviews. Authors possibly fear them more. So why is writing them such a taboo topic? Frankly, it shouldn’t. As reviewers and bloggers, we make some unspoken promise to be honest with our readers. How can we not? But I’ve seen other bloggers face attacks for their honesty.

Jenn from Jenniely inspired me to write this post (thank you, deary!). She discussed the reasons why she doesn’t write negative reviews. And I agree with her. For my next discussion post though, I want to address why they’re important and why we should write them.

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Beyond the Blurb | Criticizing Reviews

Here’s another addition to my discussion post, Beyond the Blurb. I want to talk about criticizing reviews. I find this topic contentious. We bloggers all have different opinions on the same book or of the same author. Sometimes we’ll disagree, and that point is where situations will get dicey. I don’t have a problem with the different opinions. I draw the line when people start harassing others because of their opinions though.

Maybe not all of you have seen the hostility bloggers receive once they post their review. Unfortunately, I have, and I don’t see this trend disappearing any time soon. So when does critiquing a review drift more into criticizing? Making your complaint personal doesn’t help. Yes, we all read the same book, but how we read it and what we see will differ. For example, you may see misogyny as nothing more than a horrible plot device in a book, but I may see it as a way to show how our world is mirroring fiction. When you attack someone, you aren’t helping your side. And you aren’t building up your opinion. Instead, you weaken it.

I’ve seen bloggers attacked for not speaking up. Now I see why those people came after bloggers. But becoming one, I see the dangerous line we walk once we hit the publish button. But we have an avenue to stand up where some people may not have that right to do so.

I would rather have people come to me and ask me why I didn’t talk about these problematic scenes than have them attack me. I’m still branching out into the diverse world. I’m still learning, and I want to support diverse authors and their books. So I may not pick up on something that you may blatantly see. Having an opinion in 2018 has turned toxic. We pit ourselves against each other. And somehow this toxicity has drifted into literature, which has been trying to combat the problem.

Several books have suffered because of this issue. Veronica Roth’s Carve the Mark was one of the most anticipated books of 2017. But when the reviews came out during the release, bloggers were borderline harassed by other readers. They obviously didn’t pick up on the ableism and racism in the book, or they simply didn’t believe they were offensive. Some of the reviews that talked about those concerns persuaded me not to read the book. But what I didn’t expect was the firing squad who lined up those chosen few reviewers and fired hatred.

If you have a red flag about a review, talk about it. Don’t criticize, and don’t belittle that person. Your point won’t come across to anyone. But your anger will, and it won’t help your cause.

 

What are your thoughts on this topic? When does someone cross the line when critiquing a review? When does it become criticizing?