Review | Daughter of the Siren Queen by Tricia Levenseller

Daughter of the Siren Queen by Tricia Levenseller

Published by: Feiwel & Friends

Publication Date: February 27, 2018

Genre: Fantasy, Romance

Page Count: 352

Rating: 4.5/5

Source: Purchase

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Alosa’s mission is finally complete. Not only has she recovered all three pieces of the map to a legendary hidden treasure, but the pirates who originally took her captive are now prisoners on her ship. Still unfairly attractive and unexpectedly loyal, first mate Riden is a constant distraction, but now he’s under her orders. And she takes great comfort in knowing that the villainous Vordan will soon be facing her father’s justice.

When Vordan exposes a secret her father has kept for years, Alosa and her crew find themselves in a deadly race with the feared Pirate King. Despite the danger, Alosa knows they will recover the treasure first…after all, she is the daughter of the Siren Queen.


“I may not have been born in the sea, but I was born to rule it. I am the daughter of the siren queen.”

Alosa is back, and she is ready to defend what is hers. Going into this sequel, I wasn’t sure if it could top my love of the first. Oh, how was I thoroughly mistaken. Daughter of the Siren Queen reminds me why I love sirens and pirates. Tricia captures what intrigues you in Pirate King, then cranks up the thrill factor.

One downfall of the Pirate King is that it doesn’t explore the rich world Tricia has created. And while reading it, I hoped for more world building. But do not fret. Tricia comes through and shows us a devious world ripe for the taking. She makes being bad fun. And some authors don’t always achieve that feeling. But she weaves a wicked tale that will hook you in and make you want to slit some throats. I got lost in this finale, and I want the world to know this series is worth the risk.

As Alosa recovers the final pieces of the map that will lead to the lost treasure, her father’s secret surfaces, and she and her crew must race against the pirate fleet and her father in order to claim the treasure as her own.

Tricia beautifully executes a fast-paced thrill ride that keeps you on the edge. It’s almost as if you can smell the sea breeze, hear the flap of the sails, and feel the sword in your hand. She blends together loyalty, friendship, strength, and feminism to create a truly imaginative novel. And yet she squeezes in just a bit of romance, and I’m left breathless.

Even though this sequel is plot-heavy, I feel that the characters drive the overall novel. From little Roslyn to Niridia, they are the beating heart, and I fell in love with all of them. I left a special piece of myself with the crew of the Ava-Lee. I must say, though, Alosa and Riden are what solidify Siren Queen into such an enjoyable read. Both their chemistry, banter, and growth make my heart swell with pure happiness. And the way they connect with the crew is magical. However, Alosa’s development stands out the most though. She will be one of my cherished characters.

The author introduces us to more siren mythology and Alosa’s history, which is much darker than I anticipated. But what I adore is how she doesn’t make the sirens purely bloodthirsty. They’re more regal, majestic, and otherworldly. And Alosa reflects their qualities and characteristics while she internally battles with both sides of herself. That inner turmoil speaks volumes.

Daughter of the Siren Queen is one of the most enjoyable sequels I’ve read this year. Do not take another moment debating to read this series. You need to read it. Now.

“Your enchantments last long after your song fades.”

Review | War Storm by Victoria Aveyard

War Storm by Victoria Aveyard

Published by: HarperTeen

Publication Date: May 15, 2018

Genre: Fantasy, Dystopian

Page Count: 672

Rating: 3.5/5

Source: Purchase

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Mare Barrow learned this all too well when Cal’s betrayal nearly destroyed her. Now determined to protect her heart—and secure freedom for Reds and newbloods like her—Mare resolves to overthrow the kingdom of Norta once and for all…starting with the crown on Maven’s head.

But no battle is won alone, and before the Reds may rise as one, Mare must side with the boy who broke her heart in order to defeat the boy who almost broke her. Cal’s powerful Silver allies, alongside Mare and the Scarlet Guard, prove a formidable force. But Maven is driven by an obsession so deep, he will stop at nothing to have Mare as his own again, even if it means demolish everything—and everyone—in his path.

War is coming, and all Mare has fought for hangs in the balance. Will victory be enough to topple the Silver kingdoms? Or will the little lightning girl be forever silenced?


“I am less than his crown, but he is less than my cause.”

With betrayal and heartache, deadly politics and a revolution, War Storm has the makings of a truly spectacular ending. I cannot remember the last I eagerly awaited for the finale in a series. And while War Storm is one of my most anticipated reads of 2018, I want more. Even if I’ll always hold this series in high regard, I am disappointed. Perhaps I simply expect too much from it.

When I first bought Red Queen, this series immersed me into such a politically charged world. And yes, I admit that the tropes Victoria uses may not sit well with everyone. I cannot fault her for that though. However, I love her writing. And I love how I evolved my reading because of her storytelling. But I want her to take more risks and give Mare the ending she deserves. The finale seems underdeveloped. And I walk away from this series asking for more. Am I the only reader who feels this way? I don’t know.

I think sometimes we readers gamble with stories. We cannot predict what may happen to the characters we love. And we cannot dictate what happens. The story is the author’s design. And Victoria has taken chances many readers do not like. But this ending feels, to me, unfinished. Even though I leave this series disappointed, I credit Victoria for achieving what she has done. I respect her for sticking to the story she decided to write. And she forges her own path.

She weaves in current political issues that affect us today and creates multi-layered, albeit scary, world. And she writes real and conflicted characters readers can relate to. Mare has grown up from the thief roaming the Stilts to the poster child of the revolution. I‘ve cried with her, screamed at her, yet she’ll be one of my favourite characters. Now with Cal, I still want to throttle him. His crown comes before anything, but he soon realizes it isn’t worth the pain.

But Victoria misses an opportunity to make Maven outshine even his own mother. While I hate him, the author doesn’t explore the internal struggle he faces because of what Elara did to him. She offers you glimpses, but I want more from this troubled character.

Evangeline, the magnetron I wish suffered horribly, surprises me the most. And one reason why I enjoyed this book is because of her. Her character growth and overall arc make me root for her. And even though, at first, she’s an unlikeable character, I’ve grown to like her. Was I expecting this? No. Two years ago, I never would have uttered those words.

I will always respect what authors want in their stories. I may not agree with the final product, and I may too high expectations, but the story is their own. The Red Queen series will always have a place on my shelf, but maybe I expect too much from War Storm.

What are your thoughts on the final installment of Red Queen? Did you leave disappointed? What did you love the most from it?

Review | A Court of Frost and Starlight by Sarah J. Maas

A Court of Frost and Starlight by Sarah J. Maas

Published by: Bloomsbury

Publication Date: May 1, 2018

Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy

Page Count: 272

Rating: 3.75/5

Source: Purchase

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Feyre, Rhys, and their close-knit circle of friends are still busy rebuilding the Night Court and the vastly-changed world beyond. But Winter Solstice is finally near, and with it, a hard-earned reprieve. Yet even the festive atmosphere can’t keep the shadows of the past from looming. As Feyre navigates her first Winter Solstice as High Lady, she finds that those dearest to her have more wounds than she anticipated–scars that will have far-reaching impact on the future of their Court.


“Stars flickered around us, sweet darkness sweeping in. As if we were the only souls in a galaxy.”

You all know I love the ACOTAR series. I cannot get enough of it, so when I heard Sarah is expanding this world, I haven’t been that giddy for such a long time. So if you’re a dedicated fan like me, A Court of Frost and Starlight is on your most anticipated books of 2018.

I wasn’t expecting huge revelations in ACOFAS, but I hoped for more spunk and spark displayed in her previous books. This novella is more toned down. But again, my expectations shouldn’t be high. But they are, and that is where I’m conflicted with this book. The story takes place six months after the war. The Night Court is still healing. Scars and destruction cling to all the courts. So when the Winter Solstice arrives, Feyre and her family are determined to celebrate it.

This character-driven novella is beautifully written. And I easily fall into this world. I adored reading the lighthearted scenes. And Sarah opens up and gives you heartwarming glimpses of characters you’ve grown to cherish. The four aspects that make ACOFAS such a memorable story are the storytelling, character developments, personal healing, and Nesta.

Yes, Nesta. Her growth will shock you as it does me. And while some readers may say she doesn’t deserve Cassian, somehow their pain, anger, and strength complement each other. And let’s be honest: I ship Nessian. I haven’t shipped a couple this hard before (other than Feysand). I had an inkling that Sarah might take Nesta down this path. This author somehow perfectly demonstrates the human condition. She weaves together these complex emotions into layered characters arcs I haven’t seen before. So I’m dying to see how Nesta lets Cass in and allows herself to move past her agony. Or I will riot.

Now onto my number one OTP: Feysand. I hear the collective sigh and squees from here. Yes, I came for the smut, but I stayed for the love. Do you know much much I adore and envy their relationship?! I’ve been rooting for them since ACOTAR (even though the word mate is excessive), and finally, they get their future. Cue the ugly crying! And while their past still haunts them, they somehow grow stronger. This book is a perfect ending to their story.

A Court of Frost and Starlight is a tale of healing, love, ghosts, and pain. It reminds you why you keep coming back to the ACOTAR series. And while I didn’t enjoy the pace and some other scenes, I wouldn’t give us this series for another.

Review: This Fallen Prey by Kelley Armstrong

This Fallen Prey by Kelley Armstrong

Published by: Doubleday Canada

Publication Date: January 30, 2018

Genre: Adult, Mystery, Thriller, Contemporary

Page Count: 400

Rating: 4/5

Source: Purchase

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When Casey Duncan first arrived at Rockton, the off-the-grid, isolated community built as a haven for people running from their pasts, she had no idea what to expect. There are no cell phones, no internet, no mail, and no way of getting in or out without the town council’s approval. She certainly didn’t expect to become the town homicide detective. But, the very last thing she expected was for the council to drop a dangerous criminal into their midst without a plan to keep him imprisoned. And she never thought that she’d have to be responsible for him.

The longer Oliver Brady stays in town, the more people seem to die around him. When evidence begins piling up that someone inside Rockton is working as his accomplice, Casey races to figure out who exactly Brady is and what crimes he’s truly responsible for committing.


I have always enjoyed Kelley’s decisions to explore other genres. Thriller seems to suit her almost as much as fantasy. And now, she ups the ante in this already nerve-wracking series. She doesn’t stray away from the vile side of our humanity. She somehow perfectly shows you what we humans are capable of inflicting onto others. And this unremorseful and daring storyline is why she is my favourite author.

Spring arrives to Rockton, a secluded town in the Yukon where people come to hide. Casey, her lover and sheriff Eric, and the residents believe they can finally move past the horrific events that rocked this community. But this hidden and often bought-for town comes with a price. The Council, a governing body who decides who enters and stays in Rockton, drops off a sadist murderer for safe keeping. Even though this man swears he’s innocent, people start dying, and Casey and Eric must find out why and who may be helping him.

The town is built on a corrupt concept. People buy their way into this community. They are either running from someone who will kill them or trying to escape authorities. You’d think the Council vets out the serial murderers or rapists, but money is its determining factor. This time, it may harm, not support Rockton.

I somewhat missed the slower pace from the two previous books. That atmospheric tone creates a complex and thrilling environment to read. In This Fallen Prey though, Kelley never stops the fast-paced action, which sets this book apart from the last installments. Her writing grips ahold of you and frightens you. She demonstrates how people revert back to their primal form when society no longer exists, and laws do not apply to them.

This Fallen Prey is an unnerving and suspenseful read that keeps you fearing what is next for these characters. You are on this gripping ride as much as the Rockton residents are. While I enjoyed how Kelley weaves in the tension, she excels at making this sequel a character-driven treat. Casey will be one of my favourite characters. Even though her past still haunts her, she doesn’t let the darkness win. And the relationship with Eric, who is finally opening up, just makes the storyline sweeter.

The Rockton Thriller is one series you shouldn’t miss. With murder, trickery, and plot twists, This Fallen Prey will keep you on the edge of suspense. I’m eagerly awaiting to see what’s next.

Do you like thrillers? What is your favourite series? Let’s talk in the comment’s section!

Review: Lost Souls by Kelley Armstrong

Lost Souls by Kelley Armstrong

Published by: Subterranean Press

Publication Date: March 31, 2017

Genre: New Adult, Mystery, Modern Gothic, Fantasy

Extent: 192 pages

Rating: 4/5

Source: Purchase

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The disappearing hitchhiker is one of the hoariest urban legends, and no one knows that better than Gabriel Walsh, a lawyer who grew up on folklore and myth. When author of books on the supernatural Patrick brings Gabriel a case of a hitchhiking woman in white who vanished on a country road after accepting a ride from a businessman, Gabriel knows the Cainsville elder is just trying to wheedle into his good graces. But Gabriel is a man in need of a mystery, one that will get him back into someone else’s good graces. His investigator, Olivia Taylor-Jones, has blown town supposedly on a simple vacation. But when she left there was a rift between them and…he misses her.

Gabriel is well aware the only thing Olivia loves more than a good mystery is a weird one, and this hitchhiker case more than fits the bill. As Gabriel digs into the story, he’s forced to face ghosts of his own and admit that the woman in white isn’t the only one who has lost her way.

With Lost Souls, New York Times bestselling author Kelley Armstrong weaves an unmissable novella-length tale connected to her fan-favorite Cainsville series.


How many more of Kelley’s books can I read? Meh. All of them. Kelley takes you on a mystery-packed adventure that will surely satisfy her Cainsville fans.

After his disastrous reaction of finding out he’s the reincarnation of Gwyn ap Nudd, the king of the faries, Gabriel Walsh tries to find a way to get onto Olivia’s good side. So when Patrick, a Cainsville elder and Gabriel’s father, comes to him with an intriguing case of a woman who disappears after accepting a ride from a man, Gabriel takes it. But this case is more than it appears to be, and he must come to terms with his past and his ghosts. Set between Deceptions and Betrayals, Lost Souls blends together urban fantasy with lore to create a fascinating novella.

I admit I’m a huge Cainsville lover. Kelley thrives in her mystery and modern gothic series. For the last several years, I’ve been giddily awaiting to jump back into Olivia’s world. You get mix of fae and Welsh lore, huge dose of mystery, and––come on, you know I am leading up to this point––steamy male characters. So when I found out the book is split between Gabriel’s and Patrick’s POVs, I couldn’t wait to pick it up, even though my bank account said otherwise.

Kelley takes inspiration from lore and urban legends, but she twists them to make them her own. Her stories often turn into character-driven pieces. The Cainsville series itself has captivated me since Omens. I cannot get enough of it. So having a continuation of Cainsville just adds more layers to an already complex series. With Lost Souls, you get a better understanding of Gabriel and his inability to have people in his life. I’ll always be on the fence about him, because I feel that Gwyn holds more sway on him than Arawn has with Ricky. Obviously Gabriel’s past continues to control his present and future, but there’s no excuse for his behaviour toward the people he loves. But with this new insight, at least I feel that I can see why he acts this way and maybe acknowledge his reasoning behind his coldness.

Subterranean Press books are a luxury I’m willing to pay for. So expect gorgeous design, beautiful interior illustrations, and an engaging storyline. My hat is off to Xavière. She possesses an uncanny talent to capture any scene in Kelley’s work. And finally I can see what Liv, Ricky, Gabriel, Patrick, and Rose look like!

So if you’re a Kelley Armstrong and Cainsville fan, Lost Souls will be a treat for you. It opens up Gabriel’s world, shows you, for once, Patrick’s guilt of not being there for his son, and lets you watch Liv and Gabriel’s friendship grow.