Who Am I Book Tag

Who else is dying for this weekend? I am thrilled to have a long weekend. Or at least, I’m happy to have more time to read and forget everything else I should be doing.

I found this tag on Hammock of Books. I loved what Kay wrote and wanted to take a try at it. Obviously, if you haven’t checked out her blog, you’re missing out.

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The Seven Deadly Sins Book Tag

Okay, evildoers,

You know I won’t walk past this kind of tag. And then I saw Jess, my devious twin from Fiction No Chaser, post it. And well, my resolve fizzled. Actually, it’s nonexistent. So let’s not go there. Not worth it, right? Right.

Before you get to the rest of my post, go and give Jess the admiration she deserves. If not, I may hurt you. You know, for a person who 5′ 2″, I threaten people at an obscene rate.


WRATH | What author do you have a love/hate relationship with?

Gena Showalter. I was so thrilled to get into her first series. But when she killed my OTP and gave a lame excuse, my love for her and her series shriveled up.

 

GLUTTONY | What book have you devoured over and over again with no shame?

The series is my guilty pleasure. I prefer the newer series better, but I have an affinity for Church, Magnus, and Silent Brother Jem.

 

SLOTH | What book have you neglected to read due to laziness?

I’ve looked at this book and walked by it every day, but I still can’t pick it up.

 

PRIDE | What book do you talk about most in order to sound like an intellectual reader?

Most of the time, I have a sarcastic lit to my voice, and it doesn’t help I swear worse than a well-educated sailor. I do not need a book to sound like an intellectual. I’ll trip on my own two feet and kill any chances of convincing you. ๐Ÿ˜‚

 

LUST | What attributes do you find attractive in male or female characters?

Dominant, territorial, broody, cocky, silent characters may be my downfall. If I find a real man who has these attributes, I AM A DEAD WOMAN.

…A ridiculously large ego is also good, even if it annoys me to all hell.

 

ENVY | What book would you most like to receive as a gift?

This choice may be a cheat, but Meeghan is my book fairy godmother and has gifted me the Australian copy of Aurora Rising. I opened up her email and legit cried when I read it.

I’ve been waiting for a good moment to mention her kind gift. So thank you, darling!! ๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ–ค๐Ÿ’œ


I Tag

Laurie | Merline | Loretta | Meg & Leah | Brittany | Sarah | Amy | Destiny | Mandy & Sha | Ainslee | Suzy | You!

Top Ten Tuesday | My Most Loved Book Adaptations

Happy Tuesday!

I truly believe nature forgot it’s supposed to be Spring right now. But I can’t complain. I’d rather be warm underneath a blanket instead of dying in my sweaty meat suit.

Top Ten Tuesday, originally created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, is a weekly meme. The next prompt is all about the page-to-screen freebie. And I want to talk about TV shows and movies I adore, but I haven’t read the books that inspired them. Ugh, how can I possibly call myself a book blogger if I haven’t read the books?! Hear me out though.

But more importantly, enjoy my fan-filled post.

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Beyond the Blurb | How the Stress of Reading Can Kill the Love of It

Happy Monday, darlings,

Since I’ve somewhat taken a short step back from the blogging scene, I noticed many bloggers struggle with reading challenges, marathons, and even book slumps. Now, until recently, I was in the latter. And it took me a while to get out of it. Since I’m out, I realize I’ve put too much pressure on myself to not only complete my Goodreads Challenge but also read quicker.

Have readers and bloggers turned reading into a sport, not kept it a cherished pasttime? I believe we have. And more of us are understanding the adverse effects of that shift.

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The Jonas Brothers Book Tag

Oh boy, if my 15-year-old me were to do this post, I’d be on the floor laughing. Now? I’m just chuckling. Yes, I don’t listen to the Jonas Brothers, even though some of them are cute. I’m more of industrial rock, rap, indie rock, and some metal fan.

But I love Sha and Mandy from Book Princess Reviews and thought the tag was interesting. So here I am! Don’t forget to visit their blog! Do it.

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Beyond the Blurb | Do Bloggers Need to Use Trigger Warnings?

Morning, everyone!

Let’s talk about trigger warnings. They may be a hot topic in the book community. But they’re important to readers.

I know several people who believe they’re more politically correct. I disagree. People forget why others need them. They’re similar to the film and TV rating systems. You don’t see viewers complain about the system, now do you? Probably not. The systems help adults decide what their children should or shouldn’t watch. So why do people complain about trigger warnings?

Perhaps political correctness does come into play here. Maybe people have had enough warnings and being conscientious of other people’s thoughts or mental stability. Heaven forbid we people try to be, I don’t know, proactive to prevent a trigger. Their primary reason is to inform potential readers of subject matters that may adversely affect them. A good example is sexual assault in literature. I had a hard time finishing Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander because the assault and torture of Jamie Fraser are almost too much. I wish I had paid attention to some of the warnings, but I didn’t.

So in my next discussion post,ย  I want to discuss why I believe bloggers should use trigger warnings and why they’re essential to the reading experience.

 

Warning Readers Who Have Faced Abuse Can Prevent a Harmful Response

I have a hard time reading about any type of abuse in books, especially sexual. I am dealing with my past, and it’s hard enough to wade through my memories. But when a book contains a trigger, sometimes, I may remember what happened to me. Since I have PTSD, depression, and anxiety, I need to know how severe these scenes are in stories so I don’t need to add another outside force into the mix. I have my mind to do that for me.

Many other readers are dealing with the same issue. And they deserve to have some warning, even if it may have been seen as a spoiler so they can avert a potentially damaging reaction. But what is a reaction though?

Triggers aren’t simply a bad feeling from reading a scene in a book. A trigger can lead to suicidal thoughts, flashbacks, nightmares, depression, relapses, and self-harm. As a blogger, you need to realize that it’s your responsibility and job to tell readers.

 

They Help Readers Decide if They Will Either Read or Purchase a Book

I have followed trigger warnings from other bloggers when I decided on buying a book. They gave me that warning. And if I have more concern than normal, I’ll ask for more details. I appreciate that notice. Sometimes, I don’t immediately read the book I’ve recently purchased. So if I’ve waited past the return policy, I’ve wasted a lot of money when I could have spent it on another book.

 

Not Every Author or Even Publisher Will Inform Readers of Negative Topics in Books

When I first cracked open Girls of Paper and Fire, by Natasha Ngan, I let out a sigh when I saw the trigger warning in the book. I don’t see that in most books. And most of the time, I don’t see authors telling readers about anything. Now, I’m not saying I don’t see warnings from authors at all. In fact, I see them in the reverse harem community. And I love how readers and authors are informing new readers.

 

Trigger Warnings Are Personal, so You Don’t Decide Who Does or Doesn’t Need Them

Yes, when people prevent themselves from seeing/reading triggers because they have a mental illness, that action isn’t always a healthy coping mechanism. They can’t heal from their trauma when they avoid it. However, that doesn’t mean you get to decide when they process and handle their trauma. You don’t give them a deadline. They need to make that decision, not you, the author, or the publisher.

Trigger warnings will always be personal. So do not insert yourself into someone’s decision.

 

They Will Never be a Spoiler

Do you know what a spoiler is? Someone yelling “Snape kills Dumbledore!” Trigger warnings are not. At all. Get that out of your head. They warn readers. No, they do not go into detail about topics or situations in the book.

 

So what is your opinion on trigger warnings? Do you believe they’re warranted, or do you believe readers should go in blind?

The Birthday Book Tag

Morning, bloggers!

I need to ring in this birthday since I am stumbling into a new decade. A large part of me feels as if I don’t deserve to celebrate. Everything going on in my life demands my time, and another birthday shouldn’t matter. I’m reaching a milestone though.

So that is why I’m posting this tag, which I found on Amb Reads. If you haven’t taken a look, please do it now. Amber has a wonderful blog, so head over there!

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Get to Know the Blogger Tag

Morning, bloggers!

I may or may not have forgotten to finalize this post until after I finished watching Maleficent. I certainly forgot to work on my second post though. But I have no shame. That movie deserves all my time. So I’m checking up before my midnight deadline. ๐Ÿ˜‚ I don’t know why I do this to myself.

Sara from Bibliophagist tagged me. And I want to thank her for doing so. I love you, darling. Please give her post all the love it deserves.

Rules:

  1. Thank the person who tagged you!
  2. Link back and credit the original creator (GoodeyReads)
  3. Answer book questions about yourself.
  4. Answer the other questions about yourself.
  5. Change the last 5 questions when you tag someone else (if you want! โ€“ the more random the better)
  6. Tag at least 3 people.
  7. Have fun! (ooh, that was cliche)

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Top Ten Tuesday | Characters Who Remind Me of Myself

Morning, darlings!

May is, I hope, turning out to be a fresh start. And I am counting down the days to celebrate my 30th birthday. And even though I am undecided of what to do, I’m intrigued to see what this new decade will offer. But I have to admit that I’m more excited to read some of my anticipated books more than anything, really. ๐Ÿ˜‚

Top Ten Tuesday, originally created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, is a weekly meme. The first TTT prompt of the month is characters who remind us of ourselves. Ahaha, I get to show off my dark (and slightly weird) side. ๐Ÿ˜ˆ So get ready for stabby and powerful women!

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Review | The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris

The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris

Published by: HarperCollins

Publication Date: September 4, 2018

Genre: Historical Fiction

Page Count: 288

Rating: 3/5

Source: Purchase

Goodreads | Indigo | Amazon CAN | Amazon US | Book Depository


In April 1942, Lale Sokolov, a Slovakian Jew, is forcibly transported to the concentration camps at Auschwitz-Birkenau. When his captors discover that he speaks several languages, he is put to work as a Tรคtowierer (the German word for tattooist), tasked with permanently marking his fellow prisoners.

Imprisoned for over two and a half years, Lale witnesses horrific atrocities and barbarismโ€”but also incredible acts of bravery and compassion. Risking his own life, he uses his privileged position to exchange jewels and money from murdered Jews for food to keep his fellow prisoners alive.

One day in July 1942, Lale, prisoner 32407, comforts a trembling young woman waiting in line to have the number 34902 tattooed onto her arm. Her name is Gita, and in that first encounter, Lale vows to somehow survive the camp and marry her.

A vivid, harrowing, and ultimately hopeful re-creation of Lale Sokolov’s experiences as the man who tattooed the arms of thousands of prisoners with what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust, The Tattooist of Auschwitz is also a testament to the endurance of love and humanity under the darkest possible conditions.


โ€œTo save one is to save the world.โ€

When the Tattooist of Auschwitz first hit the blogosphere, I knew I had no chance of passing up this historical fiction. I set the bar high for it. And while I loved the imagery of hope, resilience, and survival, my expectations fizzled out by the end. I wish I loved it. But I can’t.

It is a horrifying tale of hope. With that said, I’m not entirely convinced that many facts in this novel are accurate. In fact, the Auschwitz Memorial has put doubt of the events that took place. I am not criticizing a novel about Auschwitz or the Holocaust. I am critiquing the storytelling, the authenticity of what has been told, and claims the author put into her work.

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